News

Big Bang-quet Charity Challenge a Success!

March 30, 2016

Origami Rehab won second place in the Big Bang-quet Charity Challenge!  A second place win provided Origami a $5,000 credit with the University Club to host their next fundraising event and over $6,000 in donations through votes.  Origami's fundraising efforts are used for the Unfolding Potential Fund.  The Challenge is sponsored by the University Club of MSU, the MSU Federal Credit Union and the Capital Region Community Foundation.  Thank you all for your continued support!  

Origami's Tammy Hannah, Executive Director, featured on WKAR

March 14, 2016

"Sometimes there are leaps and bounds, other times it’s celebrating those baby steps. There’s a level of appreciation, dedication, devotion - a passion required for anybody working with brain injuries. You just have to embrace it to see those opportunities. It’s hard work for everyone involved.” — Tammy Hannah, on WKAR

Listen to the WKAR Segment

Origami Partners with Burcham Hills to Expand Brain Injury Care

August 24, 2015

To improve treatment options for brain injury clients, Burcham Hills and Origami Brain Injury Rehabilitation Center are collaborating to offer “Origami at Burcham Hills,” the region’s only inpatient treatment program designed exclusively for adults who require skilled nursing care following a brain injury.

The partnership brings together two of the region’s leaders in rehabilitation and allows an interdisciplinary approach of Origami’s brain injury specialization and Burcham’s broad-based rehabilitation and skilled nursing care.   

“Recovering from brain injury is unique for each person and requires an individualized approach,” explains Tammy Hannah, Origami executive director.  “Our partnership with Burcham enhances our inpatient treatment options.”

“We believe many patients will benefit from this innovative program,” says Pam Ditri, Burcham executive director.  “Partnering with Origami will enhance quality of care for our brain injury patients.”

“Origami at Burcham Hills” will provide 24/7 skilled nursing care and physical, occupational, recreational and vision therapy, along with vestibular and psychological rehabilitation.

Origami Brain Injury Rehabilitation Center is a non-profit organization operating in partnership with Michigan State University’s College of Osteopathic Medicine and Peckham Inc.   With a focus on returning clients to active and productive lives, Origami leverages the expertise of its partner organizations to consistently produce effective outcomes.  

Founded in 1974, Burcham Hills, a not-for-profit, continuum of care community, offers quality living in its Resident Center and short-term rehabilitation and skilled nursing care in its Center for Health & Rehabilitation.  Burcham also offers onsite physical, occupational and speech therapy to the public in its Outpatient Therapy Clinic. 

Origami Rehabilitation Center Announces Major Expansion

June 23, 2015

Mason, MI – Origami Brain Injury Rehabilitation Center announced today plans for a major expansion of facilities and services to begin in June 2015.  The $3.5 million expansion adds nearly 40% more residential capacity to Origami’s transitional and long-term care programs, as well as significantly larger clinical facilities highlighted by an advanced therapy gym, improved multi-purpose space, and upgraded office facilities.

A new 6-bed residence featuring private rooms in a 6,000 sf home-like setting will further expand Origami’s post-acute continuum of care for brain injury survivors to include an assisted living track in addition to the existing neuro-rehab and semi-independent living programs.  Additionally, the clinical expansion adds over 4,000 sf of clinical space and the installation of advanced therapy equipment allowing for significant growth of Origami’s outpatient services with the region’s most technologically advanced therapy gym devoted exclusively to brain injury rehabilitation. The development is expected to create over 20 new Lansing-area jobs in the coming year.

“This expansion allows us to maintain and grow our leadership position in the region’s brain injury rehabilitation community” said Tammy Hannah, Executive Director of Origami.  “The physical enhancements to our facilities will be reflected in both the effectiveness and efficiency of the care we provide to our clients, and in their ability to transition to greater levels of independence and quality of life”, Hannah continued, adding that the expansion affords Origami a significant increase in client capacity.  The announcement comprises the first phase of a five-part master growth plan for Origami.

Origami Brain Injury Rehabilitation Center is a nonprofit organization operating in partnership with the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine and Peckham, Inc. Located on a 35-acre wooded campus just south of Michigan State University, the facility offers a comprehensive and individualized continuum of care for adults who have sustained mild to severe brain injury, from outpatient and community based programs to transitional and long-term residential care.  With a focus on utilizing the broadest spectrum of resources available to return clients to active and productive lives in the local community, Origami leverages the expertise of its partner organizations to consistently produce effective outcomes.

To learn more about the services available at Origami please call (517) 455-0278. Additional information about Origami can be found online at www.origamirehab.org.

Origami Brain Injury Rehabilitation Center Awarded Contract by Department of Veterans Affairs

June 10, 2015

Mason, MI – Origami Brain Injury Rehabilitation Center announced today that it has been awarded a contract by The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to participate in the Assisted Living Pilot Program for Veterans with Traumatic Brain Injury (AL-TBI). Origami is one of 20 facilities nationwide to be awarded a contract, effective through October 2017.

Under the AL-TBI program, Veterans meeting the eligibility criteria are placed in private sector TBI residential care facilities specializing in neurobehavioral rehabilitation. The program offers team-based care and assistance in areas such as speech, memory and mobility. Approximately 100 Veterans are currently participating in the pilot as VA continues to accept new eligible patients into the program.

“We are honored to have the opportunity to participate in this valuable program and provide our specialized assisted living services to Veterans with traumatic brain injury” said Tammy Hannah, Executive Director of Origami. “We believe we are well positioned to help meet the VA’s commitment to enhancing the rehabilitation, quality of life, and community integration of these men and women of service” Hannah continued.

For more information about the TBI program, visit www.polytrauma.va.gov.

Origami Brain Injury Rehabilitation Center is a nonprofit organization operating in partnership with the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine and Peckham, Inc. Located on a 35-acre wooded campus just south of Michigan State University, the facility offers a comprehensive and individualized continuum of care for adults who have sustained mild to severe brain injury, from outpatient and community based programs to transitional and long-term residential care.  With a focus on utilizing the broadest spectrum of resources available to return clients to active and productive lives in the local community, Origami leverages the expertise of its partner organizations to consistently produce effective outcomes.

To learn more about the services available at Origami please call (517) 455-0278. Additional information about Origami can be found online at www.origamirehab.org.

 

Origami’s Tammy Hannah Named to CACIL Board of Directors

March 20, 2015

Lansing, MI - Tammy Hannah has been named to the Board of Directors of the Capital Area Center for Independent Living (CACIL).

Hannah is Executive Director of Origami Brain Injury Rehabilitation Center, a Lansing area provider of brain injury rehabilitation services.  Her extensive background in rehabilitation includes certifications as both a brain injury specialist and occupational therapist.  She also serves as a Surveyor in Medical Rehabilitation for the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF).

“I am honored to serve CACIL in this capacity, as I fully believe in their mission. They are working hard to improve the environment and quality of life for people with disabilities”, said Hannah.  “Their commitment and advocacy has made a tremendous difference in our community” she continued.

CACIL, formed in 1976, is a Lansing-based leader in creating awareness and providing support and advocacy for improved access, inclusion, and quality of life for those with disabilities.

Origami Hosts The Charity Challenge Pep Rally to Raise Funds for Brain Injury Survivors

February 27, 2015

LANSING, MI – Origami Brain Injury Rehabilitation Center invites the public to The Charity Challenge Pep Rally on Wednesday, March 11, 2015 from 5:30 to 7:30 P.M. at the University Club of MSU. This lively fundraising event will feature entertainment, raffle prizes, hors d’oeuvres, cash bar, and the opportunity to learn more about Origami.  All proceeds raised at the event through tax-deductible donations will benefit brain injury survivors with much needed services via Origami’s Unfolding Potential Fund.

The Pep Rally promotes Origami as they compete for donations against 21 other Mid-Michigan charities participating in the University Club of MSU’s Big Bang-quet Community Charity Challenge.  The more donations secured the greater Origami’s chances of winning the Charity Challenge and building the Unfolding Potential Fund.

No tickets are needed but Reservations are highly encouraged. Support Origami today by contacting Tammy Hannah, Executive Director, at info@origamirehab.org or 517-455-0252.

 ”Votes” ($5 per vote) can also be cast online prior to, and after, the event until Tuesday, March 24 at 5 P.M. at www.universityclubofmsu.org/theclubwithaheart.  

The Unfolding Potential Fund creates opportunities for Origami to enhance the lives of brain injury survivors in situations where they need additional support in areas such as education, job development, transportation, or personal development; and through emergency requests to address time-sensitive needs such as food, clothing, shelter, utilities, household, and medical care.

Origami is a nonprofit organization located on a 35-acre wooded campus in Mason, just south of the MSU campus. The facility offers a comprehensive and individualized continuum of care for adults who have sustained a traumatic brain injury, from residential to outpatient and community based programs with the resources available to return people to productive and active lives.

To learn more about the services available at Origami please call (517) 455-0264. Additional information about Origami can be found online at www.origamirehab.org

Origami Becomes First in State to Secure Cutting-Edge Driving Simulator

September 17, 2014

Origami Brain Injury Rehabilitation Center today unveiled a new, cutting-edge driving simulator that will be used to assist Lansing-area traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors as they work to improve cognitive, perceptual, and motor skills and regain their independence. 

The simulator is the only one of its kind in the state of Michigan and was made possible from a grant provided by Capital Region Community Foundation (CRCF), a traffic safety grant from AAA Insurance, and a grant through the Origami Unfolding Potential Fund.

“Thanks to our great Lansing-area partners, TBI survivors in mid-Michigan now have access to a groundbreaking rehabilitation resource,” said Tammy Hannah, OTRL, CBIS, Executive Director at Origami.  “Origami is committed to using the latest and most exciting technology to assist survivors.  This driving simulator will make a real difference in a lot of lives.”

Thanks to a $7,750 grant from CRCF, a $7,245 traffic safety grant from AAA Insurance, and a  $10,000 grant from Origami’s Unfolding Potential Fund, Origami secured the cutting edge CDS 200 Clinical Driving Simulator, which will be used during driving evaluations, as well as treatment for individuals with cognitive, perceptual, and motor impairments as a result of a TBI  or other neurological disorder. 

Driving evaluations on the simulator will help determine whether survivors are safe to continue driving, and help survivors regain their independence in a safe environment. 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), each year an estimated 1.7 million Americans experience a traumatic brain injury.  As many as 80 percent of individuals who suffer a TBI resume driving, many without receiving an evaluation or recommendation from a rehabilitation professional.

The new driving simulator will help ensure individuals are ready to return to the road, while helping them regain the driving skills and confidence they need to safely get back behind the wheel.

“We are pleased to support Origami’s work and are eager to see the driving simulator put to use by survivors of traumatic brain injury,” said Dennis W. Fliehman, president and CEO of the Capital Region Community Foundation. “This simulator will provide an important new tool in the rehabilitation process for people in mid-Michigan.”

The Capital Region Community Foundation currently has more than $80 million in assets and was created by the community as a vehicle to support the charitable needs and philanthropic interests of people living in Ingham, Eaton and Clinton counties. The Community Foundation receives gifts to establish endowment funds, and the income generated by the nearly 400 funds is returned to the community each year in the form of grants to a wide variety of charitable organizations. The Community Foundation awards hundreds of grants annually, totaling more than $3 million each year. 

Origami Board of Directors Appoints Tammy Hannah to Executive Director

June 27, 2014

Origami Brain Injury Rehabilitation Center today proudly announced that Tammy Hannah, OTRL, CBIS, has taken the reins as the center’s Executive Director.  Hannah previously served Origami clients and traumatic brain injury survivors as the Director of Rehabilitation Services and co-Executive Director. The appointment follows the departure of co-Executive Director, Eric Hannah, who is leaving Origami after more than 12 years of service, to pursue a new opportunity. 

“Tammy is a remarkable leader and advocate for both survivors of traumatic brain injuries and their families,” said Mitch Tomlinson, President of the Board of Directors at Origami.  “Tammy’s knowledge, experience, and commitment to our clients make her the perfect choice to lead Origami.”

A graduate of Saginaw Valley State University, Hannah has been working in brain injury rehabilitation for more than 14 years.  She joined Origami in 2000, where she has served as a full time therapist, Director of Rehabilitation Services, and Administrator & Licensee of the center’s Adult Foster Care Home, among other roles.

“Origami is on the frontlines helping survivors of traumatic brain injuries put their lives back together,” said Hannah.  “I am honored and excited about the opportunity to lead Origami as we focus on real results for Lansing area families.”

“Everyone at Origami is also grateful for Eric Hannah’s service over the last twelve years.  Eric has positioned Origami as a community leader, and has been an invaluable resource and advocate for TBI survivors.  With Tammy, we know leadership responsibilities at Origami remain in very capable hands,” said Tomlinson.

New Concussion Law Reemphasizes Awareness, Education Push

August 9, 2013

Concussions have always been an issue in football.

But they'll be weighing a little heavier on high school coaches when practice begins next week following the death of another NFL player, former Grand Valley State University quarterback Cullen Finnerty.

Autopsy reports Thursday showed Finnerty died in part because of the effects of repeated concussions which can bring on a disease called chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE.

The fact that several NFL players who committed suicide were found to have CTE has led to new laws and more research into concussions.

It also has coaches, parents and athletes rethinking how they train and play, according to Al Slamer, the football coach at Holt High School.

"Parents, coaches, and players are all involved in this so I think that as we increase knowledge and we increase the education with this we'll keep our kids safer," Slamer said. "I think it's a great plan."

Slamer said Michigan's new concussion law reemphasizes what's been required by the Michigan High School Athletic Association for the state's high schools since 2010, which is teaching safer and smarter playing techniques while increasing awareness.

"We're talking in terms of keeping heads up, contact with hands and shoulders and chests, and those types of things to keep the game safe," he said. "The key part is to involve the parents, to involve the players themselves, and to involve our coaches at all levels."

In light of the new law along with the deaths of several former NFL players and even the NFL's adoption of it's own comprehensive concussion policy, Dr. Sandra McCormick, a psychologist with the Origami Brain Rehabilitation Center in Mason, Mich., said the mentality amongst athletes and coaches is headed in the right direction.

"It's helping athletes to know what a concussion is and to accept that and not just brush it off," McCormick said. "It needs to be handled in a serious manner because accumulated concussions are devastating to the brain."

Whether sustaining repeated hits in practice or on the field, McCormick also said the best way to avoid traumatic injury or conditions like CTE is to give the brain enough time to heal between hits.

"If the brain has never been able to heal the first time, what you have then is this hurt brain going back in, suffering even more damage and that can be serious," she said.

McCormick added CTE changes the physical cells within the brain which means an individual with the disease can't be diagnosed for certain until after death when doctors are able to examine the brain tissues, although research into the disease and better diagnosis is ongoing.